Chuck Hoey, Curator
museum@ittf.com
Issue # 12
May 13, 2009
ITTF Museum Newsletter
From the Curator's Desk

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP
SPECIAL ISSUE
The World Championships in Yokohama are finished and we congratulate the Organizing Committee for a heroic job well done. The LIEBHERR ITTF Museum Tour continued with an exhibition at the arena, which proved quite popular with the fans - over 10,000 visitors, a record for our traveling exhibit. Special thanks to Tour sponsor LIEBHERR, Tour partners JOOLA and DHS, and to David Yip of Okinawa, my very capable coordinator, along with the dedicated team of volunteers & security.
The exhibit was divided into 4 zones: the Japan zone, with only Japanese items, a Technical zone, which showed racket and ball evolution, a Cultural zone, which included the celebrity photo gallery, and a semi-open air theater, with hourly films of vintage world champions in action.
The 16-meter illustrated Timeline history was by far the most popular exhibit, drawing daily crowds from one end to the other. The Celebrity Photo Gallery provided much entertainment as usual, and the Ball Evolution display case consistently had the most fingerprint smudges at the end of each day, a clear sign of an interesting exhibit.
I am pleased to report that 17 World Champions came into the exhibit and kindly posed for photographs while pointing to their place in history on our Timeline. The photos below summarize the Yokohama experience. Enjoy!

The exhibition and theater flanked the commercial booths - good location!
The Technical Zone, including a television, which captured live action
The Timeline consistently attracted large crowds

The Celebrity Photo Gallery, a crowd favorite, featuring leaders, musicians, actors, sports heroes ...
The Japan zone began with the Emperor, showing him as a young Crown Prince playing Table Tennis
The Theater was open air style, 65 seats

2000 Olympic Gold medalist & 1995 World Singles Champ, Kong Linghui
Jean-Philippe Gatien, 1993 World Singles Champion
Seiji Ono, 1979 World Singles Champion
Wang Tao, 1993,95 Men's Doubles, 1991,93,95 Mixed Doubles Gold
Jorg Rosskopf, 1989 Men's Doubles Gold, with Fetzner
Wei Qingguang, 1988 Olympic Doubles Gold, 1987 Doubles Champ

Ryu Seung Min, Gold Medalist at the Athens Olympic Games
Qiao Hong, 89 Singles Gold, 89,95 Doubles Champ, donated her bat
Peter Karlsson, 1991 World Doubles Champ, still in excellent shape!
Thomas vonScheele, 1991 Doubles Champion, with Peter Karlsson
Steffen Fetzner, 1989 Men's Doubles Champion, with Rosskopf
Erik Lindh, 1989,91,93 Team Gold for Sweden

Sachiko Morisawa, 1967 triple Gold medalist, donated her racket
Impeccable Shigeo Ito, 1969 World Singles Champion
T. Hayashi, 1952 Men's Doubles Gold with N. Fujii
Liang Geliang, 1977 Men's Doubles, 1973,79 Mixed Doubles Gold
Gao Jun, 1991 Women's Doubles Champion
I was impressed by the interest taken by very young visitors

Contact the curator to receive e-mails about the new issues: museum@ittf.com
Online Table Tennis
History Journal

A magazine devoted to the history of Table Tennis and its memorabilia is available free as a pdf download via the ITTF Museum website, or by direct link: Magazine

The Table Tennis Collector is published 4 times a year, and is enjoyed not only by collectors across the globe, but also by those who are fascinated by the colorful history of our sport - over 2 million pages downloaded since the ITTF Museum began its publication in 2006.

Each issue is packed with 24 pages of historic information: research articles, vintage photographs, exhibit reports, and regular columns on auction trends, books and Table Tennis philately. The Spring issue was released on 1 May; it shows some surprising Heavy Metal from Japan, challenges the readers with another mystery photo, and looks at new dicoveries & old treasures. Visit the Museum homepage: www.ittf.com/museum and click on the magazine cover to retrieve any issue. Allow time for the pdf download to complete, as they average 4 MB in size.
Did You Know ... ?
There are over 5000 pieces in the ITTF Museum, including 1000 rackets! Why not plan a visit to the Museum soon - groups welcome. Contact the curator to make a reservation.